4th ENSEC Conference

Zagreb-Croatia

travel information

 

By plane

Zagreb International Airport (IATA: ZAG), is located 17 km south-east from the city center in the district of Pleso.

Neighboring airports in Rijeka, Ljubljana, Graz, Klagenfurt and Trieste are serviced by low-cost carriers and are often a viable alternative to travelling directly to Zagreb. EasyJet flies to Rijeka, Ljubljana and Ryan Air flies to Pula, Graz and Klagenfurt.

By train

Glavni kolodvor - Zagreb's Main Railway Station

Zagreb is a railway hub which has direct services to major European cities such as Vienna (6 hours), Budapest, Zurich, Munich, Salzburg, Ljubljana, Sarajevo, Belgrade as well as domestic services to all major towns (except Dubrovnik). There is also an all-year-round overnight train (with sleeping compartments) between Zagreb and Split.

Rail travel times within Croatia have been made competitive with car travel in many instances with new 160 kph “tilting trains” connecting Zagreb with Split and other major cities in Croatia such as Varaždin, Osijek and Požega. If you make a reservation early enough you can get a substantial discount.

Tourists coming from or going to neighbouring capitals should note the following EuroCity and InterCity railway lines:

Most services are operated by the Croatian Railways, whose schedules are also available on the internet in English.

By car

Almost all highways (motorways) in Croatia start or end in Zagreb.

Travellers from Vienna can pass by Graz and Maribor and then take the A2 highway upon entering Croatia. Mind the toll in Slovenia.

Travellers from Budapest can pass by Székesfehérvár and then use the Croatian A4 motorway. It also connects Varaždin.

Travellers heading from Serbia, Bulgaria, Macedonia, Greece and Turkey can use the Croatian A3 motorway to reach Zagreb.

Travellers heading from Ljubljana can use the A3.

Travellers coming from the west - Italy, as well as Rijeka or Istria - can use the A7 motorway (near and bypassing Rijeka), A6 motorway (Rijeka-Bosiljevo) and then the A1 (Bosiljevo-Zagreb).

Those travelling from Italy can bypass the expensive motorway toll in Slovenia by using the state route SS21 through Trieste, route E61 through Slovenia (in a bad shape) and then A7 south to Rijeka, then Rijeka bypass, then A6 east to Bosiljevo and A1 northeast to Zagreb.

Travellers heading from the south - Dalmatian coast (Zadar, Split, Dubrovnik, ...) or from Montenegro - can use the A1 highway, often combined with the state roads D8 (by the coastline) and D1 (through the hinterland).

To use highways in Croatia you must pay a toll either in Croatian national currency, the Kuna, or in Euro. One may also pay by credit card- American Express, Diners, Master Card, Maestro or Visa cards. A third option is to use the HAC Smart Card, which can reduce the cost of travelling on the Croatian highways by 10-25%. It is issued by Hrvatske Autoceste, but pays off only if travelling more than 500 km (that's a return trip Zagreb-Zadar or Zagreb-Serbia) or 250 km for a seasonal Smart Card (a return trip Zagreb-Rijeka or two return trips to Zagreb from Austrian border).

By bus

The central bus station (Autobusni Kolodvor) is located to the south-east of the railway station - approximately 10 minutes walk, or 3 stops by tram (lines 2 and 6). Timetable information and prices can be found on the AKZ website: www.akz.hr

Numerous Croatian and International coach operators maintain scheduled lines covering all major domestic and European cities, as far as London, Paris, Rotterdam and Amsterdam, numerous cities in Germany, Belgium, Switzerland, Italy, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Slovenia, Hungary, many destinations in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, and Macedonia.